Perfectly Preserved’s Mixed Berry Jam with Juniper & Lime

Perfectly Preserved’s Mixed Berry Jam with Juniper & Lime

If anyone knows how to make good jam, it’s 2020 Double Gold Artisan Marmalade winner Jacqueline Morris, also known as Perfectly Preserved. Whipping up small batches of jam, jellies, marmalades, caramels, curds and chutneys from her home in West Sussex, her award-winning preserves offer amazing flavour combinations using high-quality, seasonal ingredients. 

We were delighted to recently welcome Jaki to our test kitchen to see her expert jam making in action, and to pick up some great insider tips about how to make the perfect preserve. This recipe is so easy to make with a bag of frozen berries, but the lime and juniper berries add a wonderful tart flavour. Once made, we enjoyed some thickly spread onto fresh croissants. Add gin for the perfect boozy treat or gift. 

Traditionally, jam is made using equal quantities of sugar and fruit. While it’s a rule of thumb to cook jams to a setting point of 105°C, if cooking a recipe where there is less sugar, the jam will set at around 103-104°C. But if you want to be sure of a firmer set, take your jam to 105°C.

 

Ingredients

1kg bag of frozen mixed berries
700-800g granulated sugar
Juice and zest of 2 limes
1 tsp juniper berries, crushed
Gin (optional)

Method

1. First sterilise your jars. You’ll need six 190ml jars or a mix of sizes. To sterilise in a dishwasher, put the jars and lids through a hot cycle (at least 60°C) shortly before you need them. Leave them to air dry. To sterilise in the oven, wash the jars and lids in hot water then place in a preheated oven (140°C/120°C fan/gas mark 1) for 15 minutes. Switch off the oven and leave them inside until needed.

2. Empty the fruit into a large, heavy-bottomed pan. Add the lime juice and zest and the crushed juniper berries. Heat gently until the fruit has softened and released its juices.

3. Add the sugar a third at a time, stirring gently with a wooden spoon until completely dissolved. The bottom of the pan shouldn’t feel grainy.

4. Increase the heat and bring the mixture to a steady boil. Boil for around 5-6 minutes and then start checking the temperature with your Thermapen.

5. Remove from the heat once the mixture has reached 103-105°C and stir gently and slowly  in one direction to disperse any scum. Any remaining scum can be removed with a slotted spoon.

6. Allow the jam to cool slightly, this stops the large berries floating to the top, but be sure to pot before the temperature falls below 87°C.

7. Using a heatproof jug or ladle and funnel, fill the sterilised jars to the brim and put the lids on immediately. A teaspoon of gin can be added to each jar if you wish.

8. Leave to cool before labelling. Store the jam in a cool, dark, dry place. The jam is best eaten within 9 months. Once opened, refrigerate and eat within 2-3 months.

 

 

 

You might also like:

Richard Holden’s Quintessential British Scones

Victoria Sponge Cake with Homemade Jam & Italian Buttercream

Modern Jam Workshop with Mary Cadogan

 



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